The Milky Way over Monument Valley

Jul. 27th, 2017 04:36 am
[syndicated profile] apod_feed

You don't have to be at Monument Valley to see the Milky Way arc You don't have to be at Monument Valley to see the Milky Way arc


Assignments are out!

Jul. 27th, 2017 12:21 am
equinox_vids: (Default)
[personal profile] equinox_vids posting in [community profile] equinox_exchange
If you signed up for Fall Equinox, you should have an assignment email from AO3! If you didn't receive an email, your assignment doesn't match what you offered, or you have any other concerns, email us as soon as possible at equinoxvids@gmail.com.

The mandatory check in for all vidders is Sunday, August 20th. Until then, happy vidding!

(no subject)

Jul. 27th, 2017 12:04 am
kittydesade: (irksome)
[personal profile] kittydesade
I don't want to go to capoeira or finish the day out at work I just want to go home and die in a ball under the covers, can I do that?

(Capoeira would probably actually be really good for me, what with the kicking and punching, but people and politics are making me so goddamn tired today. I called my Senators for the second day in a row! I never do that two days in a row! But it's been so fucking hideous lately that I did it anyway!)

Basically instead of a leisurely or even a steady but doable day at work it was endless phone calls, orders with complications, technology not working, camps staffed by people who needed help with the dye products, and other fiddly things that required my attention. And any one of these things is fine! Or two or even three, sequentially, but not concurrently for a full eight hours argh. Especially the only printer my computer was hooked up to not working. This is not helping me do anything.

I did at least manage to get about 2/3 of the day's Starlight writing written though. And I finished the summaries for Patreon and did a post draft. Put in some notes for a blog post to come. Got a buttload of day jobligations done, heh. It wasn't that bad a day. It was just very chaotic and oh my god but the kicking people in the face, or rather the not thinking about anything and just doing physical drills over and over for a couple hours, and then practicing physical routines? So theraputic for that kind of head-spinny thinky-busy day.

I had a tall glass of cider okay don't judge my lack of proper words.

Books Meme + Update

Jul. 26th, 2017 04:35 pm
wendelah1: Fox Mulder reading (reading is fundamental)
[personal profile] wendelah1
Tomorrow my husband has an appointment to see someone who isn't his doctor because his doctor is on vacation. He's feeling worse rather than better. Maybe he needs a different antibiotic. We'll see.

I'm tired and distracted. I'm thinking about defaulting on my kidlit exchange. I can't focus on writing.

~/~/~

Books I finished:

Jane's Warlord by Angela Knight. This is yet another time-travel romance. The time-travel plot is silly but when isn't it? The serial killer plot is even worse but that's not why you're reading this book. The romance is standard fare. Warrior Boy from the future travels back in time to save newspaper girl, they have the best sex like ever, and girl returns with boy to his own time (and planet--did I mention he's not from Earth?) and they live happily ever after. She gets to take her cat, too. Luckily, the universe doesn't break from the strain. If you like your heroes to be hyper-masculine, super-human sex machines and enjoy sex scenes featuring bondage without safe-words between total strangers, this might be just what you're looking for. How do I even rate something like this? One star because it was a quick read, especially since I skimmed the sex scenes.

Time and Again by Jack Finney. It's an illustrated novel from 1970. Spoilers ) I thought the premise of the book was intriguing enough to keep reading but the execution left something to be desired. I solved the big mystery at the center of the novel by the end of the paragraph in which it was introduced. The romance fell flat. The ending was a complete dud. The style was serviceable Two lukewarm stars.

Books I abandoned:

The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick. I checked this out because of the Amazon series, which I can't watch. A consolation prize? I know it's a classic but dammit, the book is boring. I didn't care about the characters. The plot seemed inconsequential, which given the premise, is pathetic. Maybe the series is better written. Anyway, after 67 pages, I'm done with it.

The Peppered Moth by Margaret Drabble. You should know that I have read and enjoyed a number of Drabble's books. This was not one of them. It was about genetics and the English class system. I didn't get through an entire chapter of this turkey. Books about unpleasant characters leading unpleasant lives need a hook and she didn't provide one.

Books in the pipeline:

The third and final book in the kid-lit series I'm reviewing for my kid-lit book exchange. Title withheld.

PEDTM: Day 26

Jul. 26th, 2017 08:34 pm
mirabile: (Saguaro Sunset)
[personal profile] mirabile
Hurray, the electrician came! And he worked really hard and charged less than his estimate! We like him, so so much more than the electrician our contractor had hired. We have already started another list of things for him to do -- in about a year or so. Tomorrow our contractor will be back and theoretically there's only a day or two at most for him to do and then we. Are. THROUGH.

I was up early to swim my laps and then mostly hung around with Webster while the electrician worked. I made peach cobbler and lentil-rice soup, did some laundry, read, and watched Master of Lies, about Bernie Madoff. That was such a creepy movie. I also listened to some early episodes of My Favorite Murder and it was interesting listening to Karen and Georgia figure out how to work the podcast.

Now I'm in bed and about to listen to the latest Magnus Archives episode. I need to write about that podcast. It is so beautifully written and performed, and I've grown to care so much about the characters, and am so curious and a little worried about what will happen next.

Webster discovered this beautifully written essay, The Geologic Origin of the Sonoran Desert. I'm about halfway through but will re-read it, I can tell. That's where we live now, by the way: in the Sonoran Desert. It's a hot, mean place, nothing like the loving green of home.
sovay: (Sovay: David Owen)
[personal profile] sovay
In today's political news, I would like to introduce the man in the White House to the Greek hero Kaineus (m.), born Kainis (f.), whom it took the entire Centaur side of the Centauromachy to defeat, his invulnerable body hammered all the way down to Hades with stones and piled pine trees. We can argue about what the United States should be doing with its armed forces, but not about who counts sufficiently as people to continue serving safely in them.

1. On the very crowded Red Line around five-thirty this afternoon, I saw two girls—late high school, early college, one white-looking and one not—practicing what they called "subway surfing," keeping their balance without recourse to poles or hangers or fellow passengers as the train rocked and bucked between Harvard and Davis. I appreciated what they were doing; the car was so sardine-packed that I couldn't get near a handhold myself, plus I was carrying a couple of books from the dollar-sticker carts outside the Harvard Book Store (I sense a theme) and a halva brownie from Tatte's that was trying to melt through its paper bag. It was a miserable commute experience and they were making the best they could of it. I did not appreciate the male commuter about my age who turned around as he got off the train at Porter to yell at the girls for "screaming in [his] ears." They stopped subway surfing after he left. They separated and found different poles to hang on to and did not try to talk to one another across the thinning space of commuters between them. The thing is, the guy had not even been their neighbor. He'd been standing right in front of me the entire time, holding on to the pole I couldn't find room on. He could legitimately have yelled at me for breathing into the nape of his neck, but even had the girls been shouting at the tops of their lungs, thanks to our respective positions their conversation would still have had to travel through me before getting anywhere near his ears. So when the train ground to a halt between stations—because there was another train on the line, because the T never has enough money, because Charlie Baker would rather privatize public transit than allocate it any reasonable amount of public funds and incidentally fuck the unions—and there was a brief lull in the racketing noise, I attracted the attention of the nearer girl and told her that she and her friend were great subway surfers, that I'd seen and appreciated them, and that the guy had been completely out of line. I hope it didn't weird her out. I wanted to give them a reality check. The guy annoyed me. Congratulations, you don't like being on a sardine car at rush hour—neither does anyone else, but at least those girls were getting something fun out of it. They weren't losing their footing and banging into people. They were laughing. Don't yell at people when they're trying to make the world better. I feel this lesson can and should be generalized.

2. I did not expect to find myself explaining the technicalities of 70 mm to a completely different set of kids at the door of the Somerville Theatre, but they all bought tickets for Dunkirk (2017) and showed interest in the upcoming 70 mm festival—they wanted to know not just about the format itself and whether it would look different from a DCP of the same movie (spoiler: yes) but the system on which the film would be shown, which I could at least explain was not a Hateful Eight retrofit but a pair of Philips Norelco DP70s designed for just this format, installed in this theater well before Tarantino started shooting in Ultra Panavision, lovingly maintained, and capable of magnetic rather than digital sound. Then I got asked how it was possible to show 70 and 35 mm on the same machines and at that point my knowledge of down- and upconverting degenerated into "I'm not the projectionist! I don't even work here!" (After the conversation was over, I promptly went upstairs and bugged David the projectionist about the specifics just in case this ever happens to me again. I hate being asked technical questions for which I have only partial answers; it makes me feel worse than having no answers at all.) Mostly they seemed concerned that they wouldn't be able to appreciate the beautiful information density of the format if it was filtered through a system that wasn't built to handle it, the same way the high fidelity of a recording is immaterial if all you can play it back through is some crackly laptop speakers. I could reassure them that was not going to be the experience at the Somerville. I realize that programs for movies are not so much a thing anymore, but I'm thinking for this one maybe it couldn't hurt.

3. I like the photograph of this person who looks like they are wearing a spell of the sea: Taylor Oakes, "Rhue."

4. I am delighted that I have now read multiple poems employing Wittgenstein's concept of language-games, also specifically this ambiguity: Veronica Forrest-Thomson, "Ducks & Rabbits."

5. In unexpected and welcome writing news, Clockwork Phoenix 5 is a finalist for a World Fantasy Award for Best Anthology. I have a story in it, so obviously I hope it wins, but the rest of the list is full of extremely cool people and the extremely cool things they have written and I wish everyone luck!
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
Firstly, it takes very little discussion of regulations for my eyes to glaze over. Secondly, and far less constructively, if someone proposes a system that relies on genres like science fiction and fantasy being distinct rather than overlapping sets, I will start thinking about the worthy works that live in the overlap.
catherineldf: (Default)
[personal profile] catherineldf
So many things! I'm embarking on draft 2 of my current gaming tie-in story -- more info when I can share it -- and now the sink is backed up, in a totally unrelated but tiresome event. At least I got the pesto made before that happened. Oooph.

Last weekend's shenanigans included Diversicon 25, which was...a mix of things. Hanging out with Melissa Scott was lovely and I got to introduce her to a number of my friends, who were all thrilled to meet her. We had lots of good conversations and a couple of fine panels. I also got to see some other friends who I haven't seen for far too long so that was lovely as well. On the less lovely side, a contingent of the Frenkel Fan Club turned up and apparently shared their enthusiasm with the room at large at the memorial panel for John Rezmerski (who definitely did not share their enthusiasm), Michael Levy and a longtime Diversicon fan. I missed the "fun" because I was on a competing panel, which was probably just as well. I also had to "guard" Melissa from some importuning which resulted in sulking. So many eyerolls. Never insist that anyone read your work when they are clearly otherwise engaged and are sending out very clear signals that this is not the time or the place. This is even more annoying when you clearly have the wrong person to begin with and are refusing to acknowledge it. There were some other behavior "issues" as well, and given that and all the recent deaths which I think made it a much lower energy and less pleasant con than some previous years, it was a hard weekend. I hope they can turn it around for next year.


In other news, I have seen Valerian and been mostly unimpressed. Pretty though. And trip planning is moving along. I've added a trip to Blue Lagoon, a Tom of Finland walking tour, a tour of Suomenlinna Fortress and we're discussing a tour of Stockholm and of course, tea. And the Abba Museum. Good times!

sixbeforelunch: jyn erso and cassian andor, no text (star ward - jyn and cassian)
[personal profile] sixbeforelunch
...but The Force Awakens was amazing.

Now I want to rewatch the original trilogy.

(I am so screwed.)

Wednesday Reading

Jul. 26th, 2017 09:58 pm
chomiji: Doa from Blade of the Immortal can read! Who knew? (Doa - books)
[personal profile] chomiji

After I finished re-reading The Story of the Stone by Hughart, I continued on with Eight Skilled Gentlemen (also a re-read). Both books are considerably weaker than Bridge of Birds, but they're both still amusing and full of interesting little details.

Most of the other things I've read this week have been online articles that are research for the same project that got me re-reading Master Li and Number Ten Ox.

After several days of that (and writing, and work being chaotic and stressful), I wanted something pleasant and easy. So I spent some time on Big South American River, looking up favorite children's authors. I discovered that not only has someone put a number of my favorite Sally Watson historicals into e-books, they also included Poor Felicity (although the author herself seems to have re-named it The Delicate Pioneer, which strikes me as a really "dead" title). I first read this at a Girl Scout summer camp, where I was a pudgy bespectacled weirdo bookworm who hated sports but was totally unafraid of snakes and bugs, and I haven't seen it since.

Felicity Dare is a sickly, rather spoiled 19th-century Southern (U.S.) girl whose parents lose all their money in bad investments and decide to go out west to settle in Oregon/Washington territory. Both parents die along the way, leaving orphaned Felicity to her good-natured but hapless uncle. They end up in what eventually becomes Seattle, where Felicity gradually becomes healthier because of being out in nature (shades of The Secret Garden!), makes friends with kids who would definitely have been considered below her social class back East (include some Native Americans), and learns to forage, cook, and shoot a rifle. There's also an ongoing feud with a rough-hewn boy who despises her for most of the book. In the end, when her snooty cousins show up at last (they went by ship instead of overland), she has to confront their faulty assumptions and her own grudges.

It's fun, slight but with lots of interesting details, and an easy, fast read (aimed at about 10-13 year-old readers).

st_aurafina: Sameen Shaw walking in a desert with a hat on (POI: Shaw hat)
[personal profile] st_aurafina
Title: Subtraction
Fandom: Person of Interest
Rating: Teen
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Joss Carter/Zoe Morgan/Sameen Shaw
Warnings/Content: Canon character death, mourning, threesome
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: Vengeance might feel good but it doesn't make things right.

Also at the Archive

Subtraction )

Title: Recovery
Fandom: Person of Interest
Rating: Teen
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: Root/Shaw
Warnings/Content: Sickfic, Root lives, post-series
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: Shaw says she has no bedside manner, even though she hasn't left Root's side since the shooting.

Also at the Archive

Recovery )

Title: Favours
Fandom: Person of Interest
Rating: Teen
Words: 100
Characters/Pairings: John Reese/Kara Stanton
Warnings/Content: Pre-series, canon-level violence,
Notes: For [community profile] multifandomdrabble 2017.

Summary: Kara loves to show John just how much she cares.

Also at the Archive

Favours )

Looking for a book

Jul. 26th, 2017 06:19 pm
norah: Monkey King in challenging pose (Default)
[personal profile] norah
Looking for a book that would have been published by 1957.

Involves a boy who goes through a small door in a wall in the back of a garden. He time-travelled back to the 19th century, and became somehow caught up in a conflict between two wizard or magicians or sorcerers, one good & one evil. That's what we got - help me Obi Wan.

Wednesday Reading Meme

Jul. 26th, 2017 09:05 pm
sineala: Detail of Harry Wilson Watrous, "Just a Couple of Girls" (reading)
[personal profile] sineala
What I Just Finished Reading

R. Roebuck, ed., Cornelius Nepos: Three Lives: In Latin. I only read the life of Alcibiades, which was edited slightly for schoolchildren (as usual, they omitted a reference to the unspeakable vice of the Greeks). I was unaware that Alcibiades was murdered by a bunch of people who set his house on fire and then threw spears at him. That seems very thorough. I was also unaware that the Thracians were such party people; the conclusion talks about how Alcibiades was the best because when he lived with the Spartans he was all strong and austere like the Spartans (better than the Spartans, apparently), and when he lived with the Persians he was good at hunting, and when he lived with the Thracians he was good at drinking and sex. Yyyyyeah.

What I'm Reading Now

Comics Wednesday! Apparently the last issues for SteveCap and SamCap? I don't know, that was what the internet told me. Apparently we're switching to a combined Cap #25 next.

Black Panther #16, Captain America Sam Wilson #24, Captain America Steve Rogers #19, Iceman #3, Infamous Iron Man #10, Mighty Captain Marvel #7, Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #21, Secret Empire #7, X-Men Blue #8 )

What I'm Reading Next

No idea.
[syndicated profile] icanhascheezburger_feed
toys artist bread Cats - 2862341

Rato Kim is a toy artist from Seoul, South Korea who makes mainly cat themed toys. One of his latest creations is this BreadCat toy. He planned this item for a long time and was inspired by the image of cats sitting with their paws hidden so he created a cute toy of that shape. Rato Kim said: 'The most difficult thing ctreating this Breadcat was to decide what facial expression they'll have. Cats have various expressions so I chose to show few of them on Breadcats and not to go with only one face".

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Tagged: toys , artist , bread , Cats
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